Animal Care Centers of NYC Releases First Quarter 2022 Data

Maintains 93 percent placement rate despite uptick in intake

CONTACT: khansen@nycacc.org

May 20, 2022 — Animal Care Centers of NYC (ACC), the only open-admissions animal shelter serving all five boroughs, today announced its 2022 first-quarter data, available to the public here. The overall placement rate reached 93 percent with 93.6 percent of cats, 93.4 percent of dogs and 98 percent of guinea pigs and rabbits in its centers being placed either through adoptions to the public, reunifications of lost pets or through its new hope adoption partner program. 

Following national trends showing an increase in intake over last year*, ACC has seen a 25 percent increase in companion animals coming into the shelters either as stray or owner surrender. The largest increase comes from owners surrendering dogs, up thirty eight percent.

“Our focus continues to center around the community and helping families keep their pets healthy and in the home,” said ACC’s President and CEO, Risa Weinstock. “We are expanding our Community Pets program to reach even more neighborhoods. However, there are some issues that we can't solve for, the biggest being landlord restrictions on pet ownership.”

The organization was able to prevent 755 pets from entering in the shelter system through its surrender prevention program. With generous funding from The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®, ACC is able to perform admissions counseling for owners considering relinquishing their animals, providing owners with alternate solutions to keep their pets in their homes. 

Q1 Highlights:

  • Landlord restrictions continue to be the top reason New Yorkers are surrendering their canine companions.
  • Persons experiencing personal medical issues were the top reason for cat surrenders.
  • Guinea Pigs continue to overrun the shelter with an intake of 153 up 88 percent over last year.
  • The average length of stay among dogs has increased to 12 days up from a low of 5 days in 2019.
  • ACC held its first Community Pet Wellness Clinic to help 112 Bronx pets receive free vaccinations, micro-chips and veterinary care. Partners included Catskill Veterinary Services, Pets Alive, ASPCA, Besties Animal Rescue and Maddie's Shelter Medicine Program at Cornell University.

*https://www.shelteranimalscount.org/intake-and-outcome-data-comparison-for-q1-of-2021-and-2022/

About Animal Care Centers of NYC (ACC)

Who We Are
Founded in 1995, Animal Care Centers of NYC (ACC) is a non-profit organization with a mission to end animal homelessness in New York City. ACC is contracted by the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene to provide animal related services to over 9 million residents within the five boroughs of New York City. ACC’s services to the community include pet adoption, animal rescue, veterinary care including spay/neuter, lost and found pet assistance and surrender prevention programs. With full-service care centers in Brooklyn, Manhattan and Staten Island, ACC provides in-shelter care for approximately 20,000 animals every year, and an additional 5,000 through its community pets program. 

New Yorkers are encouraged to play an active role in animal welfare by adopting, fostering, volunteering and/or donating to animals in need. For more information, please visit nycacc.org.

ACC animals available for adoption can be viewed online at nycacc.app or on ACC's free mobile app, ACC of NYC (available on Google Play and iTunes).

Join us in our mission to end animal homelessness in NYC!


Animal Care Centers of NYC Experiencing Uptick in Canine Pneumonia

Treatment and prevention measures are underway as canine intake temporarily suspended at East Harlem location

May 12, 2022 — Animal Care Centers of NYC (ACC), the only open-admissions animal shelter serving all five boroughs, today announced a worrying trend in cases of pneumonia among its population of dogs in the Manhattan Care Center location. In an effort to determine the causative pathogen, the organization has begun testing dogs in their care. To date, tests indicate the presence of Streptococcus equi subsp. Zooepidemicus in four dogs. Strep Zoo, as it is commonly known, is a bacterial infection that can cause severe pneumonia and death in some dogs.

Intake for dogs is up 20% from a year ago and over half of those are surrenders. The shelter is built to house 75 dogs and has recently been over capacity, often caring for as many as 110 dogs at any given time. So far in 2022 fewer people are coming to foster or adopt, meaning dogs are staying in the shelter longer. The average length of stay among dogs has increased to 12 days up from a low of 5 days in 2019.

“The number one action item must be to move dogs out of ACC and into loving homes so we can maintain our dog population within our capacity for care,” said ACC Sr. Vice President, Animal Health & Welfare, Dr. Robin Brennen. “Shelter overpopulation has a direct effect on incidence of disease and degree and speed of spread.”  

Aggressive treatment, prevention and biosecurity measures are underway to contain the infection and reduce the risk to the current shelter population. The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals® provided much-needed penicillin, and also assisted ACC with direct clinical support through examinations, diagnostic testing and treatment. Strep Zoo is very responsive to Penicillin and its derivatives. Dogs at the other ACC locations are not considered to have been exposed or at risk of infection at this time. 

ACC is seeking help from the community:

  • To encourage adopters, ACC is waiving all adoption fees for dogs in the Manhattan shelter.
  • ACC is also holding a large dog foster orientation on Sunday, May 15 at 1:30pm. Information about attending can be found at nycacc.org/foster.
  • Several spots have opened up in the ACC Boroughbreak program, where people can take out dogs on day-trips. Information about this program can be found at nycacc.org/boroughbreak.

About Animal Care Centers of NYC (ACC)
Ending animal homelessness in a major metropolitan city like New York involves much more than simply increasing adoptions. ACC is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit that serves the community in a variety of ways including providing humane education, field rescue, counseling services and lost-and-found assistance, as well as operating the only shelters to accept all animals in need.

New Yorkers are encouraged to play an active role in animal welfare by adopting, fostering, volunteering and/or donating to animals in need. For more information, please visit nycacc.org.

ACC animals available for adoption can be viewed online at nycacc.app or on ACC's free mobile app, ACC of NYC (available on Google Play and iTunes).

Join us in our mission to end animal homelessness in NYC!